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Exploring language and human flourishing

Exploring language and human flourishing

by Stephen Watters and Johannes Merz

Human flourishing is a frequent topic in the popular and academic literature, along with the annual surveys and reports that rank the happiest nations on earth. The king of Bhutan famously described the goal for his country as pursuing Gross National Happiness (over and above Gross National Product). Many disciplines have their own matrices by which to study human flourishing each with their own foci: health, feelings of happiness, brain activity when we’re happy, economic prosperity, an absence of corruption, meaning and purpose, a clean environment, and religious involvement to name but a few. Read More
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The Living Wage

The living wage

by The Warehouse trust

Many years ago a friend and I ran a small employment/job-readiness project through our church in Gugulethu. One of the painful aspects of the work that changed my life was listening to men and women sharing stories of exploitation and racism, sometimes covert and other times overt; stories that opened my eyes to the ongoing suffering and immoral treatment of domestic staff in South Africa. Some of the stories were from homes that were clearly Christian in their stated beliefs. I started to ask questions like, “If we truly believe all people are equal, surely the way we treat staff should reflect that?”; “How can Jesus-followers who are called and motivated by the call to love our neighbours, be part of a system that is clearly exploiting others?”; Read More
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Flourishing in Burundi

Flourishing in Burundi

by Accessible Hope International

As a young woman in Burundi, living with a disability, Donathe S. lived with many horrors. Years of neglect and abuse at the hands of her family left her feeling isolated and abandoned. Sexual assault and abuse by her neighbours and others left her feeling broken and ashamed. However, deep inside her, she knew there was more to life. She wanted to  break free. She had heard of ADEMA Ministries and the therapy they provide for women in her situation, but the thought of having to relive the horror of all the sexual assault she had experienced, kept her from reaching out for nearly a year. Finally, tied up by her parents like an animal, and pregnant because of the assault of her neighbour, Donathe knew she had to push beyond her fear and get help if she was to ever be free from the prison in which she lived. Read More
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Build Back Better

Build Back Better

by United Mission to Nepal

On 25th April 2015 at 11:56 local time, a powerful earthquake rattled central Nepal. The earthquake measured 7.8 magnitudes and had its epicentre at Barpak, 76 km northwest of the capital Kathmandu. A second major quake of 6.8 magnitudes struck on 12th May and over 400 aftershocks of magnitude 4.0 or greater continued to send waves of panic to the people near the epicentres. It was hard to imagine flourishing when so much was destroyed. Dhading was one of the worst affected districts. The Post Disaster Needs Assessment completed by the District Disaster Response Committee (DDRC) reported that 681 lives were lost and 92% of houses (81,313 completely and 30,094 partially) in the district were severely damaged by the earthquake. Additionally, 318 schools with 3094 rooms collapsed, 49 Health posts collapsed, and 51 government office buildings collapsed. It is also estimated that 22,292 livestock and 11,939,000 kilograms of foods were lost during the earthquake. Five communities1 in the northern part of the district were prioritized by the DDRC as highly effected because 100% of houses had collapsed. Because these communities are also located in the high Himalayan zone, they were particularly isolated. They had lost family members, shelter, water supplies, food stores, tools of their livelihood as well as experiencing landslides that disrupted the trails that connect villages together. The mental stresses and trauma were significant. Read More
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Learning Leadership

Learning Leadership

Contributer: SIL International

As the world makes strides toward equal access, equality and social justice for all, traditionally marginalized communities are projecting their voices into the dialogue of their nations. However, language related barriers still present major obstacles to progress. Without the confidence to speak clearly, local leaders struggle to advocate for the needs of their people with government officials. The Kol people of Bangladesh felt this plight deeply. A Kol leader described the isolated life his community previously experienced: “Before we started working with SIL, I can’t remember if any government bodies ever visited our villages. People from my age group are illiterate. Things like early marriage, infant death, poor maternity health were very common…” After partnering with SIL, the Kol began social leadership training programs among youth to mobilize them as agents of positive change within the community. These Generation Next Groups (GNG) played a vital role in cultivating leadership skills necessary for community leaders to interface with the government and develop the interagency relationships to address their needs. And the formation of multilingual education (MLE) programs continues to benefit the earliest generations by helping young students thrive in the classroom. Read More
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Hunger Relief in Lock down

Hunger Relief in Lock down

by The Warehouse

An unemployed woman receives an SMS on her monochrome-screen phone. It says, “This voucher from [Khayelitsha Christian Fellowship] offers you R400 to buy food from your local supermarket. Your voucher number is 123456789 – please enter it at the till when you pay.” She goes to her nearby store, where she usually shops, and fills a basket with food that she knows her family eats and that she can make go a long way, as she has done many times before. This does not end her struggle with food insecurity, but it means her family will not go hungry today. Her eldest son is a daily wage worker who waits on the side of the road in Wetton, hoping for a day’s work as a labourer. It is this meagre earning that keeps hunger at bay most days, but there are no hopes for work in the coming weeks as the roads are quiet and empty … and will be for weeks to come due to lockdown.

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Hope in Action

Hope in Action

by The Warehouse

 

“As soon as the President announced that lock-down would be taking place in three days’ time, we asked ourselves, ‘What can we do quickly to lessen the food shortages that will be happening in the next three weeks?’ We sprung into action to organise food parcels for our most vulnerable church members and neighbours,” explains Tsakani Sibanda, leader of Church of the Nazarene Khayelitsha. It had to be immediate due to the dire needs of those around the church, including daily wage workers who would feel it the most."

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M.Phatics Guidelines

M.Phatics guidelines

Introduction to Kushamiri

Working and being in environments that are steeped in entrenched poverty, relentless inequality, greed and injustice, can leave us wondering what ‘success’ or lasting change looks like. How do we keep changing and bringing change? How do we keep moving forward as a collective, seeing God’s kingdom “come on earth as it is in heaven?” How do we keep hope alive? What does it mean to ‘flourish’ from God’s perspective?

What flourishing looks like in each of our contexts and communities may be quite different, so we can learn from and enrich each other through this process of contributing to the Kushamiri Community at the Micah Global Consultation 2021.

M.Phatics are talks to inspire, challenge and change us. They give everyone an opportunity to share what is on their heart?

Do you have an idea or a call to action that you want to share? Do you want to
challenge the Micah community with something you are passionate about? Have you a story to tell that speaks to the theme of flourishing in hard places? An injustice you would like to shed light on that hinders flourishing of all? Do you know a story of change, a testimony to learning something, history of an organisation and why it started, and more?

Find out more about how in the M.Phatics Guidelines. 

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Abundant Africa

Abundant Africa

Our decade to shape the African Century 

Africa stands at a pivotal point in its millenia-old history - the foundations we build now will influence our continent’s future. This is our kairos moment.

This paper is a declaration of hope. Like Joshua and Caleb we see the abundance of our Promised Land and, despite the giants that terrify many into unbelief, we bring a positive report to our people. If together we choose courage to lead, and obedience to God, Africa will one day be known as the abundant continent.

The paper is also designed to help start a conversation around how we shape the future of Africa. The audience is primarily for African Christian leaders in the church and society. But we welcome all to engage. The contents are the work of a number of authors, influenced by a series of consultations and conversations held in different regions of Africa to try and capture some of the important thinking on our continent.

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CONSULTATIVE MEETING ON DEBT SUSTAINABILITY

CONSULTATIVE MEETING ON DEBT SUSTAINABILITY

CONSULTATIVE MEETING ON DEBT SUSTAINABILITY FOR FAITH LEADERS AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN ZAMBIA May 2021

by Fr. Singini I. Nacidze, OMI

This document details a brief report of the consultative meeting on debt sustainability for Faith Leaders and Civil Society in Zambia. The consultative meeting was organized by Micah Zambia/ Renew our World Campaign and GCAP / Civil Society SDG’s Campaign. The report focus on how faith based organizations and the Civil Society Organizations in Zambia can help in mitigating the debt situation Zambia is currently going through.

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